Pub Med Links

These are quotes of studies posted on Pub Med that demonstrate our product Calorad may have a positive effect on health. These are only a few of a multitude of reasons for people to use it!


PubMed is a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine that includes over 18 million citations from MEDLINE and other life science journals for biomedical articles back to the 1950s. PubMed includes links to full text articles and other related resources.




Study #1

The effects of collagen hydrolysat on symptoms of chronic fibromyalgia and temporomandibular joint pain.

Olson GB, Savage S, Olson J.


Twenty (20) people who had medically diagnosed fibromyalgia for two to 15+ years participated in and completed a 90-day evaluation to determine effects of collagen hydrolysat on symptoms of chronic fibromyalgia, with twelve reporting temporomandibular joint pain. Collagen hydrolysat is a food supplement that is available without prescription, with no known side effects. Participants were evaluated initially and then at 30-, 60-, and 90-day periods. Final results were obtained and comparisons made. The average pain complaint levels decreased significantly in an overall group average, and dramatically with some individuals. It was concluded that patients with fibromyalgia and concurrent temporomandibular joint problems may gain symptomatic improvement in their chronic symptoms by taking collagen hydrolysat. 

PMID: 11202824 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]




Study #2

Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with oral type II collagen. Results of a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

Barnett ML, Kremer JM, St Clair EW, Clegg DO, Furst D, Weisman M, Fletcher MJ, Chasan-Taber S, Finger E, Morales A, Le CH, Trentham DE


Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA.


OBJECTIVE: Oral administration of cartilage-derived type II collagen (CII) has been shown to ameliorate arthritis in animal models of joint inflammation, and preliminary studies have suggested that this novel therapy is clinically beneficial and safe in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The present study was undertaken to test the safety and efficacy of 4 different dosages of orally administered CII in patients with RA. METHODS: Two hundred seventy-four patients with active RA were enrolled at 6 different sites and randomized to receive placebo or 1 of 4 dosages (20, 100, 500, or 2,500 microg/day) of oral CII for 24 weeks. Efficacy parameters were assessed monthly. Cumulative response rates (percentage of patients meeting the criteria for response at any time during the study) were analyzed utilizing 3 sets of composite criteria: the Paulus criteria, the American College of Rheumatology criteria for improvement in RA, and a requirement for > or = 30% reduction in both swollen and tender joint counts. RESULTS: Eighty-three percent of patients completed 24 weeks of treatment. Numeric trends in favor of the 20 microg/day treatment group were seen with all 3 cumulative composite measures. However, a statistically significant increase (P = 0.035) in response rate for the 20 microg/day group versus placebo was detected using only the Paulus criteria. The presence of serum antibodies to CII at baseline was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of responding to treatment. No treatment-related adverse events were detected. The efficacy seen with the lowest dosage is consistent with the findings of animal studies and with known mechanisms of oral tolerance in which lower doses of orally administered autoantigens preferentially induce disease-suppressing regulatory cells. CONCLUSION: Positive effects were observed with CII at the lowest dosage tested, and the presence of serum antibodies to CII at baseline may predict response to therapy. No side effects were associated with this novel therapeutic agent. Further controlled studies are required to assess the efficacy of this treatment approach. 

PMID: 9485087 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]




Study #3

Role of collagen hydrolysate in bone and joint disease.

Moskowitz RW.


Case Western Reserve University, Division of Rheumatic Diseases, University Hospitals of Cleveland, OH, USA.


OBJECTIVES: To review the current status of collagen hydrolysate in the treatment of osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. METHODS: Review of past and current literature relative to collagen hydrolysate metabolism, and assessment of clinical investigations of therapeutic trials in osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. RESULTS: Hydrolyzed gelatin products have long been used in pharmaceuticals and foods; these products are generally recognized as safe food products by regulatory agencies. Pharmaceutical-grade collagen hydrolysate (PCH) is obtained by hydrolysis of pharmaceutical gelatin. Clinical studies suggest that the ingestion of 10 g PCH daily reduces pain in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee or hip; blood concentration of hydroxyproline is increased. Clinical use is associated with minimal adverse effects, mainly gastrointestinal, characterized by fullness or unpleasant taste. In a multicenter, randomized, doubleblind, placebo-controlled trial performed in clinics in the United States, United Kingdom, and Germany, results showed no statistically significant differences for the total study group (all sites) for differences of mean pain score for pain. There was, however, a significant treatment advantage of PCH over placebo in German sites. In addition, increased efficacy for PCH as compared to placebo was observed in the overall study population amongst patients with more severe symptomatology at study onset. Preferential accumulation of 14C-labeled gelatin hydrolysate in cartilage as compared with administration of 14C-labeled proline has been reported. This preferential uptake by cartilage suggests that PCH may have a salutary effect on cartilage metabolism. Given the important role for collagen in bone structure, the effect of PCH on bone metabolism in osteoporotic persons has been evaluated. Studies of the effects of calcitonin with and without a collagen hydrolysate-rich diet suggested that calcitonin plus PCH had a greater effect in inhibiting bone collagen breakdown than calcitonin alone, as characterized by a fall in levels of urinary pyridinoline cross-links. PCH appeared to have an additive effect relative to use of calcitonin alone. CONCLUSIONS: Collagen hydrolysate is of interest as a therapeutic agent of potential utility in the treatment of osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. Its high level of safety makes it attractive as an agent for long-term use in these chronic disorders. 

PMID: 11071580 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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